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In the movie Eddie, Whoopie Goldberg plays a rabid New York Knicks fan who, through a series of improbable circumstances, ends up becoming the team’s coach. Early in the movie, there is a scene where Whoopie is coaching a team of school kids. After the game, one boy’s mother approaches Whoopie and angrily demands to know why her son sat on the bench for the entire game. Whoopie’s character responds by saying that the boy had gotten a “D” in English.

Mother: “What’s that got to do with him playing ball?”

Whoopie: “A lot. But your first question should’ve been, ‘Why’d he get the “D” in English?’”

Later, the struggling Knicks team is revitalized wh...

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As ballplayers grow older and advance through organized baseball, pitching restrictions slowly phase out. When young pitchers go deeper and deeper into ball games and pile up the innings, it’s not their throwing arms that typically fatigue as the season progresses.

It’s the legs and trunk that tend to give out first. Before long, pitches sail high in the strike zone. This is a result of the pitcher’s inability to forcefully stride and follow through completely, due to fatigue of the lower back, trunk, and legs.

Let’s face it, young ballplayers play catch nearly every day. Their arms get constant exercise. But how often do your pitchers work their legs and trunk when not pitching?

Striding toward home plate with each...

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When it comes to competing in youth baseball tournaments, the options are as numerous as ever before. The continued emergence of travel ball has led to the construction and renovation of world class facilities throughout the United States. And the caretakers of these fine facilities tout some of the best baseball experiences around all in an effort to lure your team to their complex. With that in mind, it’s easy to understand why coaches and parents would be overwhelmed when choosing which tournaments their team should participate in. Whether it’s cost, perks, location, amenities, or date, not all tournaments are created equal. And what may be attractive for some teams may not be what another team is looking for when pencili...

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As baseball fans, we all have our favorite teams, players and games.

The history of our national pastime is filled with nostalgia and memories that have lasted nearly 200 hundred years – since Abner Doubleday invented the game in 1839.

Sure, we can scour the Internet and relive those moments via YouTube or visit a website that brings us there instantaneously. However, there’s nothing that replaces actually being at a historic location and soaking in the aura while in the presence of greatness.

From museums to ballparks and everything in between, our country is loaded with a treasure trove of baseball destinations from sea to shining sea.

Junior Baseball once again offers you and your family a comprehensive list of must-see baseb...

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Our very own Haley Smilow recently had the opportunity to catch up with Atlanta Braves catcher Tyler Flowers. Check out the transcript of that interview below:

Catcher Tyler Flowers grew up in Roswell, Ga., where he played high school baseball at Blessed Trinity Catholic. In 2005, the Atlanta Braves picked Flowers in the 33rd round and he spent a couple years in the minors playing with teams like the Danville Braves, the Rome Braves and the Myrtle Beach Pelicans. In 2008, he was traded to the Chicago White Sox, where he played for seven years backing up AJ Pierzynski, and eventually taking over the starting spot.

In 2015, a reunion between Flowers and the Braves became a homecoming for this Georgia Native. Flowers has appeared in 613 game...

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How many times has your coach said, “You’re getting tired and you have thrown a lot of pitches. It’s time to rest that arm and let someone else finish the game?”

When your arm gets tired, your accuracy gets poor and you are unable to throw as hard. A pitcher may throw approximately 60-70 times including short tosses, long tosses, and actual pitches to a catcher before beginning a
game. A good warm-up and stretching routine will allow a pitcher to warm-up faster and can actually take 15-20 pitches off the warm-up, and save these pitches for the game.

When the coach says, “Go warmup,” most athletes think right away to pick up a ball and start throwing. That would be the last thing you should do to warm-up ...

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  1. Being able to back up bases is important. “It is part of the game,” Ramos said. “Being able to be a complete pitcher is not just throwing. Being able to field your position and back up bases, you don’t want to be a liability out there. If you want to be a starter and go later in games you have to do it all. You have to be well rounded.”
  2. No matter the level of play the fastball can be the best pitch for any pitcher. “The fastball is one of the best pitches, along with the changeup,” Ramos said. “The fastball and changeupare some of the most effective pitches. Being able to establish both sides of the plate is the most important thing with the fastball. The next thing is the change up. Those two pitchesare the most important.”
  3. Being able to use a fastball and changeup at an early age can help prevent arm problems.“You limit injuries,” Ramos said. “The fastball and changeup are great pitches to start off with since they don’t hurt your arm, or at least lessen the chance.”
  4. A fastball can actually be more than one pitch when you consider throwing to different locations. “Look at Bartolo Colon,” Ramos said of the 45-year old veteran, now starting for the Texas Rangers. “He is throwing his fastball inside and outside, up and down. He is pitching with one pitch: the two-seam and four-seam fastball. Mariano Rivera had a cutter. Being able to do that (with one main pitch) is huge.”
  5. It may be smart for a young pitcher to wait until throwing off-speed pitches. “I think I was 13 when I began to throw a curve,” Ramos said. “Then I had tennis elbow. But after that I recovered.”

AJ FUN FACTS+ Ramos was born Sept. 20, 1986 in Lubbock, Texas.+ He was the Lubbock Avalanche-Journal player of the year while at Estacado High in Lubbock.+ Ramos was drafted by the Marlins in the 21st round in 2009 out of Texas Tech.+ The right-hander was a starter in high school and college but when he was drafted the Marlins turned him into a reliever.+ Ramos made his Major League debut on Sept. 4, 2012 with the Marlins.+ Ramos is one of the few Major League players who makes trips to Europe in the off-season. For the past few years he has gone to several countries with two of his good friends: slugger Giancarlo Stanton of the Yankees and pitcher Ricky Nolasco, his former teammate in Miami who pitched for the Angels in 2017.+ For the ...

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Good student that you are (in both school and baseball, I’m sure), you know Geometry to be the mathematical study of lines, shapes and angles.

But how can understanding Geometry help you become a better baseball player? Let us count the ways.

We’ve used the image of a triangle several times before, for example, as the imaginary three-sided shape that connects your shoulders, your forearms and your hands that helps you catch any ball that’s coming your way.

We’ve also talked about keeping yourself squared up to the ball (facing it at a 90-degree angle), which helps you see it and react to bad hops better.

We’ve used the image of a straight line, too, as a way of describing the path your hands and the knob of the...

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